Myths about sex pregnancy and birth
Pregnancy

3 Myths About Sex, Pregnancy, & Birth

Today I’m sharing with you 3 common myths about sex, pregnancy, and birth.

 

 

 

Before I learned these truths, I was unable to serve my readers (you) fully and compassionately. In hindsight, I realize, I didn’t know what I didn’t know.

 

Now, I show up dedicated to helping you make the transformation you are going through as stress-free and joyful as possible because I understand that female reproduction is too often misunderstood (even at the most superficial levels).

 

I’ll explain what I’m talking about by breaking down a few common myths.

 

Myth #1: Sex leads to pregnancy

I was told that if women had unprotected sex, they’d get pregnant. You too?

 

I have since come to learn that sex doesn’t lead to pregnancy for every woman (even if she desperately wants it to).

 

Many women struggle with infertility and questions that we think are harmless like…”When are you having a baby?” can be insensitive. 

 

The truth is that sex leads to pregnancy for some women.

 

And…

 

While I don’t know the path that led to your pregnancy, I take your desire to learn about pregnancy and prepare for birth seriously because having a baby is a transformational experience that isn’t possible for every woman who wants it.

 

Resource: A Comprehensive Look at Infertility

 

 

Myth #2: Pregnancy=Baby Coming Home

When we hear that a woman is pregnant, we automatically assume a baby is going home with his/her parents in ~9 months.

 

I learned to stop making this assumption when I was sixteen because I had the unfortunate experience of standing in the hallway as I listened to my sister (two years older than me) give birth to my stillborn nephew.

 

I was reminded of this myth again after I experienced my own miscarriage.

 

So…

 

In reality, not every pregnancy means a baby is going home.

 

Too many women experience pregnancy loss and more conversations and education should be had about this topic. It shouldn’t be a taboo subject.

 

Resource: Types of Miscarriages and Statistics

 

 

Myth #3: Birth=Media Birth

Birth portrayed in the media is often shown with women in hospital beds, on their backs, sweating profusely, and screaming in intense pain.

 

Some women have births like that but that doesn’t have to be what your birth looks like and it shouldn’t need to appear as the standard. 

 

I’m not here to try and tell you what kind of birth to have; however, I will encourage you to explore your options.

 

Whether you want a hospital birth, birth center birth, or home birth, there is value in knowing what is available to you (given your own specific needs and circumstances).

 

I had a natural birth in a hospital setting (it’s possible) and it wasn’t like what I had seen in the media. Yours may not look like that either.

 

If you have no idea what kind of birth you want, put together a birth plan.

 

Birth is unpredictable but how you approach birth doesn’t need to be. A good plan for birth helps you decide what you want but is flexible enough to be open to changes in your circumstances that you can’t control.

 

Resource: Labor & Delivery Birth Options

 

 


So, I bet your next burning question is how does this information serve me?

 

Well…

 

These myths come from misinformation and lack of information that many of us have received over the years. 

 

I’m not the only one who has once held these beliefs about sex, pregnancy, and birth.

 

But…

 

Since you’ve been kind enough to give me some of your time, I wanted to use it to share the lessons I’ve learned.

 

Each time I made the realization that I wasn’t given the full truth on these topics, it was hard and it hurt. Now, I use this platform and my products to educate about pregnancy and birth so that women can be informed.

 

 

What myths about sex, pregnancy, and birth have you had to learn?

 

 


 

 

Pregnant? I recommend signing up for access to The FREE Pregnancy Resource Library. You’ll also be added to my mailing list where I share more about planning during pregnancy and preparing for birth. 

 

 

 

 

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